Sony Vaio Motion Eye Camera Troubleshooting Update

I’ve noticed that a lot of people still read my post about this. It has been a few years since I first put it up but I guess Sony Vaio laptops are hard to let go. I can understand that since I still have mine and do use it occasionally.

The hardware and OS are still the same. I have a Sony Vaio VGN-CR35G that is running Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit. To get the camera working, I did the following:

  1. Download two files: camera driver and extractor.
  2. Install the extractor. Run it and point it to the executable driver installer.
  3. Open the folder where the files were extracted to and double-click on the installer.

I used the 64 bit version since that is what I have. There wasn’t any notification or dialog box saying that it was done when I ran it. Test it by opening your video chat application and just try it out.

Thank you for visiting and I hope this still works like it did for me a long time ago. Drop me a note if you have any comments, suggestions or questions. I’m still around.

Sony Vaio Motion Eye Camera Troubleshooting Update

Bootable Linux USB Drive: How-To

It’s a new year so we’ll cut to the chase and skip the intro/background part. You find yourself in some situation needing a bootable USB drive with Linux on it. So here it is:

1) Get your hands on a working computer and plug in the USB drive you’re going to use for this project.

2) Download a Linux disk image. I recommend either Ubuntu or Mint.

3) Download a universal USB installer. I recommend one from pendrivelinuxdotcom.

4) Run the installer.

5) Select the disk image.

6) Specify which drive is the USB. Check and double check this part to be sure.

7) Specify how much of the drive you want to use for persistent storage. This is optional.

8) Click on the “Create” button and wait.

Once it is done, plug in the USB to your machine and power it up. Some computers detect the USB and boot that up automatically, while others need a settings change. You need to get to the boot menu first. It usually shows which key it is while your computer is booting up. The most common ones are Esc, F2 and F8.

The Linux boot screen is very obvious. You’ll know when it’s doing its thing. For me, it’s easy enough to figure out how to use Linux. It has a graphical UI that is similar to Windows but only has different labels and positions for the basic stuff you need. Don’t be afraid to explore and try the applications it has on offer. If in doubt, check the documentation or their forum.

Hope this helps!

Bootable Linux USB Drive: How-To

Updated Download Link: HAL.DLL

As promised, I’ve uploaded a copy of the hal.dll from my working XP machine. The file host I had been using died and disappeared. Hopefully, this new one lasts a bit longer. I wrote about my hal.dll issues in the past. The first one was about how I fixed the hal.dll error without using a cd. I was successful during that attempt but it just kept coming back. I then wrote another post about my problems with hal.dll with a lot more detail.

Here’s the download link to the copy of hal.dll: http://www.filehostfree.com/?d=51332A7C1

Best of luck!

Updated 03/03/13: Updated hal.dll download link. New link, verified working.

Updated Download Link: HAL.DLL